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20130706
20130714
STATION
KRCB (PBS) 16
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English 16
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
think so. as jamie diamond said in the previous segment, this is getting to be a better environment for banking. higher rates while there are negatives are a better thing because the spread of what you can earn on lending ver suls su cost of deposit. home prices are drifting up in the u.s. and the recent runup in interest rates isn't dampening that. those are a good backdrop for second kwaurquarter earnings. >> what are they doing so well? i'm not talking about the big ones, though, that's the main focus tonight. what are the mid-sized guys doing well? >> lending. if you look at the data for the second quarter, the large banks lending increase was over 1%, not great. the small banks overall was about 8%. so really, the small banks are the ones out there aggressively getting out there with customers and making loans. that's what they do and that's why stock prices are doing well. >> when we look at the bank index, it's been pretty much on the rise since the beginning of the year. do you see that continuing, and are there any stocks big or small in the banking sector that you are reco
to encouraging stewardship of the environment, land conservation, watershed protection and eliminating harmful chemicals. additional funding provided by: the colcom foundation. the wallace genetic foundation the e. rhodes and leona b. carpenter foundation. and by the charles a. frueauff foundation. >> this week on "to the contrary" first, sexual assault in the egyptian uprising. then, women silenced in movies. behind the headlines: poverty moves to the suburbs. hello, i'm bonnie erbe. welcome to "to the contrary," a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. up first, sexual assault and the egyptian protests. for days millions packed cairo's streets and tahrir square awaiting what they hoped was morsi's resignation. as during the arab spring, there were numerous reports of sexual assaults on women. protestors, who as voters helped bring morsi to power. the women's group operation antisexual harassment reported at least 44 cases of sexual assault on just the first day and more as protests continued during the week. a bbc journalist tweeted that women were taking refuge in h
space, an environment where they can grow, develop. >> the kids come in all colors, from all persuasions. >> no, no proselytizing. everything is done through our actions. we want to show as muslims that we're compassionate, where mercy is part of the prophetic model. that, you know, wherever we are we should serve, and we should serve at the best of our actions. we definitely believe that. that's a huge part of our faith. >> there's also the free health clinic under the supervision of dr. altaf kaiseruddin. >> i've had people walk in with, you know, just being bitten by a dog, or just being shot or just being stabbed. yes. we've got that. >> it's a muslim-run clinic for patients of all faiths, many whose only other recourse is to go to an emergency room. the clinic started at half-a-day a month. now it's five days a week, soon to be seven. >> our population tends to present a little bit later, meaning they come in with a little more advanced stage of disease, because most of the time they didn't know that they had any type of outlet or any type of access that they could get treatment. >>
laws. the presiding judge said the it giant created a mechanism and environment that enabled apple and the publishers to work together. the aim was to eliminate all competition for the ebooks. the firm will appeal the ruling. the officials said apple has done nothing wrong and the firm will continue to find against the false accusations. they sued apple and the publishers back in april of 2012. they said apple introduced a scheme to gain 30% of sales in return for allowing publishers to set prices. the publishers have reached a settlement with the justice department. that's the latest in business news. i will leave you with a check on markets. . >> some residents are still waiting to go home. advanced tracts of land are waiting to be restored. and more than half of fishing ports on the pacific coast must be rebuilt. people in north eastern japan still face challenges following the 2011 disaster. but step by step, they are moving forward. see their stories every wednesday on the road ahead right here on "newsline." >> workers at the fukushima nuclear plant are struggling to cope wit
: the satellite could be very helpful in monitoring the environment as well as giving better meteorological data on disasters on cooperation, we can use this next generation satellite. >> the participants conclude their suddenly meeting on friday. >>> more than 100 illustrators from around the world teamed up if are an exhibition for important memories. the show from hand to hand was inspired by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami. >> an exhibition featuring work from the book is currently running in tokyo. it features the art of 110 contributors from hand to hand from seven countries. the artists were asked to think about the future and the context of the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear crisis. the idea came from the organizers concern about the future of the children of the world. since march last year, exhibitionists have been held in five european countries including italy, slovakia and the netherlands. >> this piece called when is the scariest thing on earth is by japanese artist that features the nuclear power plant and an og ogre's face. for a clean future, it depicts a girl watering a baby w
and the players in the android market environment, it's a tough slog. >> reporter: how will we really know if microsoft is making the right moves? in a year and a half, we'll see products developed under this new structure, if they are mind blowing steve job will look like a genius. who will be the next microsoft ceo to make big changes? >>> the sharp rise in sales of tablets and smart phones comes at the expense of the old fashioned desktop computer. worldwide shipment ps of personal computers fell for the fifth quart near a year down 11% from april through juniper i didn't do. >>> as pc sales take a serious slide, china unseeded hewlett packard to become the world's number one pc maker. lonovo who bought them back in 2005 controls 17% of the world's pc market. hewlett packard slipped to second place. >>> ford is cutting the price of the all electric 2014 focus sedan by 10%, about $4,000 off the sticker price for this year's new model. the auto maker wants to make surprises are competitive when the focus electric hits showrooms in the next few weeks going up against different sized cars,
areas with different faiths have been incubating environments for groups who have an extremist ideology. it was a plan. weapons were brought in a long time ago. it was all planned. the lads here had been preparing in case the village was attacked. >> narrator: in may last year, as violence spread across syria, fighting finally broke out between the alawites of aziziya and their sunni neighbors. >> (translated): we were with some young men, not many of us. the attackers were in the hundreds, about 700 gunmen. >> narrator: mohammed mahmoud is part of an alawite militia that protects the village. >> (translated): as the attack intensified and the number of the terrorists increased, we retreated. so they came in here and burned everything. you can see the fire damage. >> narrator: he's convinced that his sunni neighbors have been infiltrated by terrorists with extreme religious beliefs. >> (translated): they are planning to wipe us out. they don't even think of us as humans. in their books they call our sect the "akbiya." the "akbiya" are insects that should live underground. we cannot surr
says it's too soon to tell for sure. >> it's a very dynamic environment, dealing with an active fire and trying to rescue in the realm of 300 victims. so, this time, because we have not clearly defined and established those facts, we cannot answer your questions. >> reporter: as the plane came to rest, passengers scrambled to get out, despite emergency chutes that deployed inside the cabin. 62 of them ended up here at san francisco general hospital, while another 55 went to stanford. geoffrey manley is head of neurosurgery at san francisco general, which has discharged most of its patients, but still has six in critical condition, and two with serious spinal cord injuries that could lead to paralysis. >> the ligaments were simply ripped as they went forward and back in the seat with associated bone fractures as well. it is possible that these folks will never walk again. it is also possible that with some of this rapid surgery and aggressive management in the intensive care unit that they will have a chance to possibly regain some function. >> reporter: manley said many injuries were
, in a fairly narrow, conservative cultural religious environment. a community. and i was handed a set of propositions about what-- that were important to believe, to accept, and they were well met and they were well intended. but life has gone on and i've tested those propositions against both experience and learning and reading and listening. those propositions don't make the sense to me that they did when i was a 14-year-old in the baptist training union in central baptist church in marshal texas. i still value my experience in that culture. and i'm grateful that, you know, i have been as you said earlier, life has been good to me. as it has been to you. and journalism for me has been a continuing course in adult education. and has taken me to different places where i can look back and see where i've been. i changed my mind because i realized when i was down at the bottom of the hill, i only saw a little bit of what was around me. the higher you go in age, the older you get, you can see a larger ferr rain behind you from which you can draw your experience of how the world looks and
actually perversely because we said as difficult as this is, this is the right environment in which to try to change immigration bills because it has to be bipartisan. i understand that sounds a little odd right now because we're facing these great difficulties. senate democrats can't come to terms with the house republicans but at the end of the day on an issue like this, we would be better off if we had a bipartisan bill that would asome of the concerns ramesh is raising on border security and things like that while establishing a path to legalization and citizenship for immigrants. it can probably be better done with both parties having a stake of the action. >> you both are strongly committed to the rule of law. i know that. so there are 11 million people here undocumented illegals, whatever one calls them, how does this all affect them? postponing, acting, whatever have you? >> well,. and rule of law. right. again, if you take the congressional budget office projections which the supporters of this bill have been to youing, they're saying there's a 30-50% reduction in illegal immigrat
environment was designed for an economic purpose: getting young people to save. >> this study looked at taking an 18-year-old college kid or a and transforms them into the body of someone who's older. >> reporter: specifically, into the body or future self of a 65- year-old, which in my case, the study was designed to see if bonding with their senior selves would cause kids to salt away money for retirement. if i'm a kid looking at the older version of me, the idea is that i'm making a non-conscious connection that will stay with me and change my behavior. >> exactly. you can tell someone you will be older some day but the visceral experience of seeing your image in the mirror as older than you are causes this deep connection to your future self and this is what drives future savings behavior. >> reporter: in fact, in a 2011 paper, bailenson and others reported that those who had seen their future selves in the virtual mirror subsequently put twice as much money into a savings account as those who hadn't. and the research continues. >> in future studies, were actually going to build scenarios
of the environment, our values as a nation have changed. and that's why we can look at friant dam today and say, maybe we never should have done that. but in the context of the '30s it was the right thing to do. >> reporter: for now, it remains impossible for salmon to swim the length of the river and spawn. but a few fish are living in the river, and are reproducing. still, it may take another 20 years before the restoration of the san joaquin can be judged a success or a failure. >> suarez: you can see historical images of life and development in the san joaquin river valley dating back to the 1800s. find that slide show on our homepage. >> woodruff: and to the analysis of shields and brooks: syndicated columnist mark shields, and "new york times" columnist david brooks. welcome back, gentlemen. so let's start by talking about immigration. the senate passed its bill w what two weeks ago, mark, i think 14 republicans voted for it. but now that it's in the house, the republicans are balking, what is going on if. >> well, it's a different institution, judy. the republicans who backed it recogniz
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)